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      A message to our community regarding COVID-19

      A message to our community regarding COVID-19

      Dear community: 
      As you know, we care about you A LOT. We are taking the COVID-19 pandemic very seriously and we want to minimize the risk to our community as best we can. As a post office, we are categorized as an essential service and have been mandated to remain open. As such, we are keeping a close eye on CDC, WHO, and local agency recommendations to ensure our practices are in line with the good of our public health.

      Things are changing daily, but at this moment we are on a strict and frequent surface sanitization schedule and you’ll see our team wearing gloves. We disabled signatures on our ipads so customers do not need to touch them. We have cancelled all upcoming public events.

      To encourage you to shop from home instead of in-person, we are offering 20% off all online purchases, free shipping throughout Alaska, and curbside pickup in Juneau. We hope that the same things that brought you to Kindred Post before (a mental health break, celebrating a friend’s birthday, assembling a care package, supporting artists, etc!) can remain true for you now and that we can find healthy alternatives for you to stay creatively connected with the ones you love. We have some games and ideas that we’ll be posting on FB and IG in the coming days; come digitally hang out with us.

      Lastly, a word about social responsibility. If we were not categorized as an essential service, we would close the store. Social isolation is social justice right now - it's a personal practice that represents community solidarity and community care. Flattening the curve will take widespread commitment. We're a small business, so we hate to say this .... but please don't come to the physical Kindred Post unless you have to. Even if you don't show symptoms, you may still be carrying and transmitting the virus to more vulnerable members of our community. We love you, but we love ALL of you, and we want to do our part to keep contact low.

      Know that we are thinking of you and wanting the best for everyone. Let's keep our distance, but stay connected. Take care of yourself and take care of each other.

      Love, 
      Team KP 

      Artist of the Week: Macy Possenti

      Artist of the Week: Macy Possenti

      "I want the little guy to win for a change. That’s why you’ll see my prints focusing on the cow moose or the bare birch branches; they deserve a time to shine as well."

      Macy Possenti of Printworthy

      Presenting our Kindred Artists of the Week series! We are big fans of all the artists we work with and we are so excited to share their stories!

      This week we are featuring Macy Possenti of Printworthy! Macy is a fan of bringing it back to the basics. Her Alaskan roots influence all of her screen-printed creations; ranging from tea towels to waterproof decals and even apparel. Her cards and decals are a favorite here at Kindred Post and we love them even more knowing who and where they come from. Read all about Macy and her work below!

      Who are you?

      My name is Macy Possenti and I am a weekend printmaking warrior. During the week, I am a Marketing Director with a federal agency, but when the weekend comes along, it’s full on printmaking mode.

      I grew up in Interior Alaska, with a family that has always made the most of their lives in the last frontier. Whether it was camping or fishing, berry picking or boating, there was always an adventure in store. I’ve taken these visions of my childhood, as well as new ones I’ve made along the way, and simplified them to their most basic form. Maybe it’s the fact that I enjoy minimalism, or maybe it’s the fact that I am horrible at drawing, but I find comfort in reducing an image or an idea into a completely raw and fundamental form, which is why I find printmaking so appealing.


      What do you do?

      I currently focus my art towards screen printing, with a side of lino block printing. For screen printing, I start by hand drawing my ideas and transferring them to the computer for manipulation. Once ready, the images are transferred to the screens to be hand-printed, one by one, onto various mediums. When I first started out, I printed on hand-sewn linen towels. I’ve since grown to print greeting cards, apparel, and accessories. One thing that is so great about screen printing, is that you are practically unlimited on what you can print!

      While I haven’t done much lino block printing as of late, it is still my passion. Breaking down an image into color blocks, then moving a sharp blade through warm linoleum, layer by layer, color by color to ultimately create your very own, unique image from hand is completely satisfying.


      Who/what inspires you?

      The simple things in an Alaskan life inspire me. I grow tired of seeing the state’s superlatives (no offense to the bull moose, eagles, and bears of the world) plastered on every t shirt, coffee mug, or postcard. I want the little guy to win for a change. That’s why you’ll see my prints focusing on the cow moose or the bare birch branches; they deserve a time to shine as well.

      What is your favorite moment in the process?

      The repetitive action of running the squeegee across the screen is by far my favorite part of the screen printing process; it’s almost meditative. When printing batches of cards that can run into the thousands, repeating the same motion over and over again gets you out of your own head and allows you to focus on what it is you're doing. 

      What is a trick of your trade or a piece of advice for artists in your medium?

      This is less of a piece of advice for fellow artists and more for buyers: A printmaker’s print is an original. One major misconception within the retail world is that printmakers’ work are replicas since we are able to print multiples of the same image. This just isn't true; a printmaker’s work is an original. Each print is unique, as it is run through the press or the screen individually, even to make a high-count edition. Most print blocks and screens have a lifespan on them, so once a print run is over, that’s the end. 

      What is next?

      I’m ready for some more inspiration! My agenda for this summer includes trips to the Brooks Range where I can sketch mountain peaks, taiga, and tundra. And I can’t wait to get down to the coast for some saltwater fishing.

       I Love Alaska Decal

      Artist of the Week: Em & Dave Lang

      Artist of the Week: Em & Dave Lang

      Presenting our Kindred Artists of the Week series! We are big fans of all the artists we work with and we are so excited to share their stories!

      This week we are featuring the dynamic duo responsible for High Tide Tattoo here in Juneau, Dave and Em Lang! These two are phenomenal artists and we are so lucky to be collaborating with them on our new Local Threads apparel collection. We began planning this project back in 2019 and it has reached the final stages, launching TODAY. They will be here tonight, 4:30 - 7, to sign your new Local Threads shirts and sweatshirts. Read on to see what they're all about!

      "If you truly love what you’re doing not only are you going to be working hard to make it work, you’re going to be working hard BECAUSE you love what you’re doing."

      Em Lang

      Who are you?
      Em Lang, local angry girl.

      What do you do?
      I’m a tattoo artist, weenie wrangler, bonus mom and all around swell gal.

      Who/what inspires you?
      Wild animals, bank roll, and womxn supporting womxn.

      What is your favorite moment in the process?
      I enjoy being able to sit down and draw without intention, and seeing what spills out. A lot of times when I’m generating design ideas I don’t where I am going with it, but a few minutes of doodling and shapes start to build... I get into a groove where I can see an image materializing and that feeling is incredible. A lot of what I do in my career is very specific and structured- often times directed entirely by non-artists and when I get the opportunity to just draw freely, it’s always a gift. I love that I live a life that affords me the time and support to hone my craft.

      What is a trick of your trade or a piece of advice for artists in your medium?
      You always hear the phrase “Do what you love and you’ll never work a day in your life.”- honestly, to me, that’s complete garbage advice. If you truly love what you’re doing not only are you going to be working hard to make it work, you’re going to be working hard BECAUSE you love what you’re doing. If it’s starting to feel easy, it’s time to push harder. Complacency is a killer.

      What is next?
      Oh boy- my husband Huk Yuunsk and I have a lot on our collective plates this year. We are organizing a big tattoo event in Metlaktala with some fellow tattooers to raise money for the local Boys & Girls club, I’m very excited about it. There are some projects coming up I can’t quite talk about yet... but individually, one of my big shows this year will be a solo exhibit at the Juneau-Douglas city museum called “Spit Shade”. Spit Shade will feature works done entirely with spit shading, a watercolor technique typically used to paint tattoo flash. So if tattoos and painting with spit peaks your interest, you can catch that in December 2020 at the Juneau-Douglas Museum.

      Love Letters Tee at KindredPost.comLove Letters Tank at KindredPost.comLove Letters Hoodie

      "...Establishing a language and dialog in professional tattooing that brings more understanding to both sides about a living tradition, not a relic of the past."

      Dave Lang

      Who are you?
      Huk Yuunsk di waayu, Lukwil Tsimshianu, łgu Gidiganeetsu ada kumshuwamk.  Gitsbutwada di ptegu. Dzünüü ligi Tlingit anii di waatgu ada dzogu. David Roger Lang di waam kumsuwamk.  My name is Huk Yuunsk, I’m Tsmsyen and Tlingit and euro white mutt mix. I am of the Killerwhale Clan. Juneau, which is Tlingit land, is where I was born and live today. My English name is David Roger Lang. 

      What do you do?
      llustration, tattooing and fine art with study and emphasis on my culture and language.

      Who/what inspires you?
      Em Lang. First and foremost. Sigoop Price, Gamaas Bolton, Mike and  Mique’l Dangeli, Johon and Tia Atkinson, and all the native artists and language learners in my social media feed. Keep bangin! In tattooing, Bert Grimm, Ed Hardy, Rudy Fritsch, Fillip Leu, Tim Lehi and all of Atlas Tattoo in Portland, Oregon. They do it right. 

      What is your favorite moment in the process?
      The time right after you put it down. You had your face in it so long, you can’t see it for a whole, just parts you’re working on. Then you sleep and look at it and you can see it again as a whole with fresh eyes. I feel like that’s when you really see what you’ve made.

      What is a trick of your trade or a piece of advice for artists in your medium?
      Travel, read, and stop working long enough to recharge and appreciate it.

      What is next?
      Establishing a language and dialog in professional tattooing that brings more understanding to both sides about a living tradition, not a relic of the past. The people and culture are the lifeblood of our expression and art, so acknowledging the standards set and working respectfully within them will help build a language and understanding that will supersede “cultural appropriation” arguments and sensitivities.

      Carrier Tee at KindredPost.comCarrier Kids Tee at KindredPost.comCarrier Crewneck Sweatshirt at KindredPost.com

      You can shop the entire Local Threads collection here!

       

      Artist of the Week: Koby Etzwiler

      Artist of the Week: Koby Etzwiler

      "I’ve always looked outside with wonder, and I do my best to represent my love for the wilderness in my pieces. "

      Koby Etzweiler 

      Presenting our Kindred Artist of the Week series! We are big fans of all the artists we work with and we are so excited to share their stories!

      This week we are featuring Koby Etzwiler, Alaskan college student who uses many different mediums to share his love for the wild things. His creature stickers are durable and water resistant -- just like any true Alaskan needs to be, am I right? He is clearly just getting started, and we can't wait to see what comes next! Check out the full interview below to learn about all things Koby!

      Who are you?

      Hey! My name is Koby Etzwiler, I'm a 19 (almost 20) year old kid from Alaska who just loves to create. I’ve lived in Homer nearly my whole life, but I’m currently going to college down in Oregon. I’m working towards getting my Bachelors Degree in Outdoor Recreation Management. Basically, I want to be able to work in the National Parks. I love to hike, explore, fish, hunt, and just generally be out in nature.

      What do you do?

      Most of my background was actually in watercolors and pen and ink drawings. I did almost solely those two things for about 4 years, with occasional acrylic pieces here and there, but recently I bought an ipad so I could branch out into digital art. Lately, all of my pieces have been simple black and whites, though I recently started expanding into colored pieces. 

      Bigfoot Sticker by Koby Etzweiler

      Who/what inspires you?

      My biggest inspiration for almost everything I’ve done comes from outdoors. It’s no coincidence that’s the field I’m trying to enter as well. I love drawing any mountain scene with the stars. I’ve always looked outside with wonder, and I do my best to represent my love for the wilderness in my pieces. 

      What is your favorite moment in the process?

      Honestly, my favorite parts are 1) when I get the inspiration to create something new, and 2) when I finish placing the last star. That part is always so tedious for me and it feels great to be done and look at a completed project. 

      What is a trick of your trade or a piece of advice for artists in your medium?

      The biggest piece of advice I can give for any medium I’ve worked with is watch youtube videos and ask questions. There’s always somebody out there with more knowledge on something, even if its a minor detail, and you never know who might be able to give you the advice that makes your next piece your best one yet. 

      What is next?

      My next goal is to expand my digital art style to attempt to create more realistic looking pieces. I love where my inspiration comes from, but I’d also like to learn how to do more types of scenery. If I had to pick one I’d like to learn how to do though, it’d have to be northern lights.  

             

       

      Check out his Instagram @etz_art to see more designs!

      Artist of the Week: Ben Huff of Ice Fog Press

      Artist of the Week: Ben Huff of Ice Fog Press

      "I'm inspired by the artists who, in this time of tumult and uncertainty, are showing up, putting their heads down, and telling the story of this place."

      Ben Huff in his studio in Juneau, Alaska

      Presenting our Kindred Artist of the Week series! We are big fans of all the artists we work with and we are so excited to share their stories!

      This week we are featuring Ben Huff, award-winning photographer and owner of Ice Fog Press, with whom we have the privilege of being friends and neighbors. Ice Fog Press does the printing for our Growing Upwords giclées and Ben also ships his work through our post office. We have a very strong appreciation for him and his craft, and wanted to highlight the magic he continues to put out into the world and our community. Check out his full interview below! 

      Who are you?

      I'm a Juneau based artist. Primarily, I'm a photographer, but also a bookmaker, printer and teacher. 

      What do you do?

      My days vary considerably. I run an operation called Ice Fog Press which is my publishing imprint, where I design, publish, and construct small run artist books for photographers that I appreciate and want to work with. Also, IFP is sort of a catchall for anything else that isn't my own work. As a photographer, I have a particular skill set that can be useful outside of my own artistic practice. On a given day I may be printing for another local artist, editing photos from a commercial or editorial job, teaching a class out of my studio or at UAS, or working on my own projects. 

      Who/what inspires you?

      I'm inspired by the artists who, in this time of tumult and uncertainty, are showing up, putting their heads down, and telling the story of this place. 

      What is your favorite moment in the process?

      Every step has it's rewards. The making of the pictures - being in the landscape, meeting people and making portraits, stitching it all together to make something coherent - it's a rush, an addiction. But, the end stage of printing, which I'm deep in right now, is also really satisfying. Whether its a digital or analogue capture, finally seeing the image on paper, at scale, is exhilarating. You never really know if you got it until its on paper. 

      What is a trick of your trade or a piece of advice for artists in your medium?

      Last semester I taught the Art Appreciation class at UAS for the first time in a couple years, and I show this old clip that features Chuck Close which I hadn't thought about in a while. At the end he says, as sort of parting shot to would-be artists "Inspiration is for amateurs, the rest of us just show up and get to work". As I get older, I recognize how true those words are. Every breakthrough I've ever had in my own work has come from work itself. I can be prone to navel-gazing and when I was younger, waiting for lightening to strike. It took me a long time to just trust my process, curiosity and instinct. And, that all of the bad pictures are necessary in order to get to the good ones.

      What is next?

      I have the heaviest exhibition schedule this year that I've ever had. It's both exciting and terrifying. I just released an artist book through Ice Fog Press called The Light That Got Lost, and I'll be exhibiting that work at the City Museum in February. It's an ongoing project that I've been working on for a couple years up on the ice field as arts faculty with the Juneau Icefield Research Program. Then in May I'll be showing Atomic Island, the culmination of a five year project on the Aleutian Island of Adak, at the Anchorage Museum. That show will run all summer, and come home to the State Museum in November. Also, later in the year I'll be included in a big group exhibition in Portland, and a couple smaller things that are too early in the works to speak to much about. It's going to be a big year of unveiling some things I've been working on for a long time.

                 

      Ben's Work can be seen on exhibit at the Juneau-Douglas City Museum until February 28th and on the Ice Fog Press website.