Journal

Artist of the Week: Sierra Estes

"I use ceramics to connect myself and others to the earth through the tactile and intimate experience of holding a coffee mug close, or serving a meal for your loved ones."

Sierra Estes

Presenting our Kindred Artists of the Week series! We are big fans of all the artists we work with and we are so excited to share their stories!

This week we are featuring Sierra Estes of Estes Ceramics. Sierra is the creator of the most beloved mountain mugs. She credits a desire for connection in her work and we, as you may know, thrive on connection - with our community, with nature, with ourselves, you name it. Sierra has won our hearts and we bet she's gonna win yours too. Read all about her below!

Who are you?
I am Sierra Estes, the set of hands behind Estes Ceramics. My work uniform includes clay splatters and plenty of animal hair, and that makes me happy.

What do you do?
I am a potter. I make ceramics for everyday life, pottery that fits into the daily rituals we practice together, or on our own. I use ceramics to connect myself and others to the earth through the tactile and intimate experience of holding a coffee mug close, or serving a meal for your loved ones. 

Who/what inspires you?
The earth itself is my greatest inspiration. I believe that the earth is sacred, as a
whole, and in parts. The dirt, grass, and trees are all rich and invaluable parts of
our existence. I want to interact with the earth in as many ways as possible,
being able to bring it into my daily life through my work is something I don’t feel
worthy of but strive to honor in how I make ceramics.

What is your favorite moment in the process?
As the wheel slows down and the piece is almost ready, I use the side of my
fingers or the long edge of a wooden rib to make a mark, maybe a subtle curve
or a slight dent. That moment, when I’m most tuned into the piece and my hands
and the clay have completed their ritual dance.

What is a trick of your trade or a piece of advice for artists in your medium?
Don’t rush anything. Clay holds endless possibilities, but you will still have to play
by its rules. Take the time to really learn how clay works and lean into that in your
processes.

What is next?
I have just made the transition into full-time self employment in the summer of
2019, and that includes taking on more projects all at once. I am working on
finding the best balance, routine, and processes to successfully do all of these
things and still be a living, sleeping, eating human being. My next step in this
process is to bring on an intern!

  

Don't forget we are giving away one of these beautiful mugs on our Instagram and you can get them 20% off on our website right now!

Artist of the Week: Priscilla Weidlein

"... pay attention to what brings you into the present moment, and practice cultivating that."

Priscilla Weidlein

Presenting our Kindred Artists of the Week series! We are big fans of all the artists we work with and we are so excited to share their stories!

This week we are featuring Priscilla Weidlein, an illustrator, wife and dog-mom who takes some of our favorite feelings and turns them into shareable works of art via her line of gorgeous greeting cards. Read all about her process below and inspiration in her interview below and then go ahead and fall right in love with her work just as quickly as we did. 

Who are you?
I’m Priscilla Weidlein, a visual artist based in Providence, Rhode Island. 

What do you do?
I paint watercolor portraits of people and their pets - and am accepting commissions! I also have a greeting card line and create illustrations for editorials and companies that I believe in. When I am not working in the studio, a lot of my free time is spent walking in the park with my dog and my husband. 

Who/what inspires you?
I am inspired by nature, particularly flowers, and the light that emanates from all things. 

What is your favorite moment in the process?
Presently the most enjoyable part of my process is filling bold, dense color into the lines of my pencil drawings. I like balancing intricate line work with bold color; it creates a rhythm, a dance. 
What is a trick of your trade or a piece of advice for artists in your medium?
Well, I welcome stillness. By cultivating stillness in my studio, by way of meditation, I am able to be present with the subject in front of me. Working thus becomes an extension of the meditation. It is in periods of presence that I can create work that feels truly authentic to my being. Each person accomplishes this uniquely, so if I were to spin this into a piece of advice, I’d say pay attention to what brings you into the present moment, and practice cultivating that. 

 
What is next?
Good question. In these uncertain times, a lot is up in the air about the months ahead. But what I do know for sure is that I am starting a flower study project, where every week I will paint a new flower. I do not know what will become of it, but I am so looking forward to inviting this joyful subject into my weekly studio practice.

    Cat's Pajamas Card at KindredPost.comMoment With You Card at KindredPost.com
See more of her work here!

Artist of the Week: Macy Possenti

"I want the little guy to win for a change. That’s why you’ll see my prints focusing on the cow moose or the bare birch branches; they deserve a time to shine as well."

Macy Possenti of Printworthy

Presenting our Kindred Artists of the Week series! We are big fans of all the artists we work with and we are so excited to share their stories!

This week we are featuring Macy Possenti of Printworthy! Macy is a fan of bringing it back to the basics. Her Alaskan roots influence all of her screen-printed creations; ranging from tea towels to waterproof decals and even apparel. Her cards and decals are a favorite here at Kindred Post and we love them even more knowing who and where they come from. Read all about Macy and her work below!

Who are you?

My name is Macy Possenti and I am a weekend printmaking warrior. During the week, I am a Marketing Director with a federal agency, but when the weekend comes along, it’s full on printmaking mode.

I grew up in Interior Alaska, with a family that has always made the most of their lives in the last frontier. Whether it was camping or fishing, berry picking or boating, there was always an adventure in store. I’ve taken these visions of my childhood, as well as new ones I’ve made along the way, and simplified them to their most basic form. Maybe it’s the fact that I enjoy minimalism, or maybe it’s the fact that I am horrible at drawing, but I find comfort in reducing an image or an idea into a completely raw and fundamental form, which is why I find printmaking so appealing.


What do you do?

I currently focus my art towards screen printing, with a side of lino block printing. For screen printing, I start by hand drawing my ideas and transferring them to the computer for manipulation. Once ready, the images are transferred to the screens to be hand-printed, one by one, onto various mediums. When I first started out, I printed on hand-sewn linen towels. I’ve since grown to print greeting cards, apparel, and accessories. One thing that is so great about screen printing, is that you are practically unlimited on what you can print!

While I haven’t done much lino block printing as of late, it is still my passion. Breaking down an image into color blocks, then moving a sharp blade through warm linoleum, layer by layer, color by color to ultimately create your very own, unique image from hand is completely satisfying.


Who/what inspires you?

The simple things in an Alaskan life inspire me. I grow tired of seeing the state’s superlatives (no offense to the bull moose, eagles, and bears of the world) plastered on every t shirt, coffee mug, or postcard. I want the little guy to win for a change. That’s why you’ll see my prints focusing on the cow moose or the bare birch branches; they deserve a time to shine as well.

What is your favorite moment in the process?

The repetitive action of running the squeegee across the screen is by far my favorite part of the screen printing process; it’s almost meditative. When printing batches of cards that can run into the thousands, repeating the same motion over and over again gets you out of your own head and allows you to focus on what it is you're doing. 

What is a trick of your trade or a piece of advice for artists in your medium?

This is less of a piece of advice for fellow artists and more for buyers: A printmaker’s print is an original. One major misconception within the retail world is that printmakers’ work are replicas since we are able to print multiples of the same image. This just isn't true; a printmaker’s work is an original. Each print is unique, as it is run through the press or the screen individually, even to make a high-count edition. Most print blocks and screens have a lifespan on them, so once a print run is over, that’s the end. 

What is next?

I’m ready for some more inspiration! My agenda for this summer includes trips to the Brooks Range where I can sketch mountain peaks, taiga, and tundra. And I can’t wait to get down to the coast for some saltwater fishing.

 I Love Alaska Decal